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Flowers for late summer colour

With the days and nice weather fading, so do the flowers. Without some consideration of the changing seasons you can end up with a rather empty garden. Here are some helpful tips and plant choices for you to grow, to keep the colour and flowers right up until the first frosts.

Late Summer Flowering plants to consider:

Late Flowering Summer Flowers

1: Purple Cone Flowers "Echinacea Purpurea"

Cone flowers as they're commonly called or Echinacea if you want to be fancy, are a beautiful, almost daisy like, must have perennial. They not only look stunning and come in a range of vibrant colours, but they're also a much loved flower for polinating inspects such as Bees and Butterflies.


Grow your own Purple Cone Flowers from Seed


2: Rudbeckia - Black Eyed Susan

Rudbeckia Flower Seeds

Rudbeckia are not that dissimilar to Cone Flowers, in shape or growing habit. However the subtle differences make them stand out, Rudbeckia tends to form a clump of vibrant flowers, ranging in size as they mature. Black Eyed Susan, gets its name because of the contrast between its deep black center and the bright yellow petals.


Grow Rudbeckia Black Eyed Susan from Seed


3: Rudbeckia - Marmalade

Rudbeckia Marmalade Rudbeckia Marmalade is again a close match to the other varieties in this group, however its petals give off a beautiful orange glow. Its flowers are slightly larger and just like Black Eyed Susan its loved by Bees, Butterflies and all polinating insects. They also make for great cut flowers to bring the colour inside the house.

Want to grow Rudbeckia Marmalade from Seed?


4: Gypsophila paniculata - Babys Breath

Whilst in no way a 'statement' flower, Gypsophila is an adorable clump forming plant. It will smother itself in tiny beautiful flowers ranging in hues of pinks and whites. They look great at the front of borders, as ground cover and even work well as a focal point in hanging baskets and pots and will continue to flower well into the first frosts.

Want to grow Gypsophila from Seed?